“What’s the blockage? The biology of obstructive lung disease”

Left to right: Colin Bingle (University of Sheffield, UK), John Meredith (Understanding Animal Research), Rachel Conrad (Croydon High School)
Left to right: Colin Bingle (University of Sheffield, UK), John Meredith (Understanding Animal Research), Rachel Conrad (Croydon High School)

“What’s the blockage? The biology of obstructive lung disease” was the title of our High-sci lecture on Monday by Colin Bingle (University of Sheffield, UK). Colin visited Croydon High School for Girls to talk about his research on respiratory disease, the impact of this work on patients, and how he uses mouse models to support this. Over 40 students from the school attended, many who hoped to study biochemistry or medicine at higher education.

The High-sci project is a series of lectures that aim to engage pupils with science through meeting a real life scientist, and hopefully inspire them to study a biomolecular topic beyond school. Monday’s talk was run as a satellite event to the Society’s Focused Meeting entitled “Delivering and phenotyping mouse models for the respiratory community”.

Colin (also one of the scientific organizers for the focused meeting) said …

Communication is a key part of science, and school outreach is the best way to enthuse the next generation of scientists and show that we are not all dusty old people in lab coats and safety glasses! Science is fun and there are not many careers where you get paid to do your hobby“.

In addition to Colin’s talk, John Meredith from Understanding Animal Research gave a talk about how animals are used for scientific research, and explored the ethics and reasons behind this.

More information about the High-sci talks can be found at: http://www.biochemistry.org/Education/Events/Pupilevents/HighScilectures.aspx

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